Tagged with Terri Windling

The Sword and the Stone by Alan Lee

The Sword and the Stone by Alan Lee

I took this image from Terri Windling’s gorgeous blog. Her posts are an endless source of inspiration for me so I thought I would share one of them here. A few days ago she did a post on T.H. White, one of my all-time favorite authors. There are some lovely quotes about his life and … Continue reading

On the Language of Living Things…

“Let me learn the language of trees, birds, dogs, grey stones, black beetles, green grass, and all living things. And when I’m fluent in those languages, let me translate them faithfully into stories and paintings.” -Terri Windling

The Privilege of the Sword by Thomas Canty

The Privilege of the Sword by Thomas Canty

This gorgeous illustration by Thomas Canty was created exclusively for the audio book version of Ellen Kushner’s novel The Privilege of the Sword, which was just released this week. The audiobook is part of a series called Neil Gaiman Presents and features narration by the author herself along with a full cast of award-winning actors … Continue reading

On Being Creative…

“While our intellect chases its bright and lofty visions, our  most original, powerful ideas tend to rise from muddy, murky depths below: from the clouded waters of the subconscious; from the baffling landscape of nightmare and dream; from the odd obssessions, weird fixations, and uncanny flashes of intuition that rise up from those strange parts … Continue reading

On Darkness…

“In older myths, the dark road leads downward into the Underworld, where Persephone is carried off by Hades, much against her will, while Ishtar descends of her own accord to beat at the gates of Hell. This road of darkness lies to the West, according to Native American myth, and each of us must travel … Continue reading

Black Thorn, White Rose

Black Thorn, White Rose

  This intriguing collection of fairy tales retold by contemporary authors is the second in a series of six published by World Fantasy Award-winners Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. Although the stories in the book express a wide range of literary styles, they are all adaptations of traditional tales written with an adult audience in … Continue reading

On Fairy Tales for All Ages…

“Though now we think of fairy tales as stories intended for very young children, this is a relatively modern idea. In the oral tradition, magical stories were enjoyed by listeners young and old alike, while literary fairy tales (including most of the tales that are best known today) were published primarily for adult readers until … Continue reading